Book Club: Women Heroes of WWII

Lori suggested this book after I requested something “light and easy” following my delayed completion of Filling Station last month. This was a great choice! It was simple, but still interesting and inspiring. 

Book Club with Lori

The book is split into parts, each of which focuses on one country involved in the war. Each part talks of a few women from that country who made huge impacts for their country, usually as part of the resistance movement. Some of the women I’d heard of, but most I hadn’t. I think that’s what makes the book even more inspiring – it’s largely filled with untold stories.

Here are a few of my favorites.

Sophie Scholl – She is one of the few I’d heard of before, and her story is especially tragic. As a writer, editor, and distributor of The White Rose pamphlets in Germany, she was eventually arrested. Within just a few hours of her arrest, she’d already been tried, found guilty, and executed.

Josephine Baker – An African American who emigrated to France, Josephine was a performer. She used her position as a celebrity to garner information from the enemy and turn it over to her allied superiors. 

Magda Trocme – She was the wife of a pastor who taught that it was important to help those in need, even if it meant legal trouble for you. She took this very seriously and ended up bringing over 5,000 refugees (3,500 Jews) to safety with the help of others in her village. Despite her husband’s arrest, she continued the work in his absence. They both survived the war.

Irene Gut – She was a 17-year-old Polish nurse who was forced to work not only in the hospital but also as a waitress in the military dining hall. She used this position to learn the plans for the Jews and to save them, even using the home of her employer (a German officer) in her quest.

This is a very small sampling of the stories in this book, and all of them are definitely worth reading.

In addition to the stories of the women, each part opens with a brief history of the war in the country being highlighted. Even though the book is an easy one to read (it’s technically a children’s book), it was both informative and enjoyable. Please make sure to read Lori’s post for her thoughts on the book.

Next month, we’ll be reading Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley. This book caught my eye in the grocery store checkout line a while back, so I bought it. I’ve already read it, so my post will definitely be on time next month 😉

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Blessings,

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Paquita – Opening Night

The older boys have been taking dance classes since September, around the time I started taking ballet. The difference between us is that they’ve stuck with it; I didn’t (I found that it hurt my feet because of the split sole on the ballet slippers). They danced in The Nutcracker at Christmastime, and Seahawk had a solo in that.

For the past couple of months, their dance studio has been putting together another production, and this weekend is the performance. Last night was Opening Night, they perform again tonight, and there’s a matinee for the closing tomorrow. I was a backstage helper last night, and I’ll be in the audience on Sunday afternoon. Because I wasn’t in the audience last night, I don’t have pictures of the actual performance (I’ll try to do a new post with those next week), but I do have this one of the boys in their costumes, hanging out backstage. I love how they look like they’re palling around together! Proof that they do sometimes get along 😉

Ballet Boys Paquita opening night

Have a great weekend!

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Learning to Forgive (YWAM review)

A little over a year ago, we had the opportunity to read and review our first YWAM Publishing biography (we chose C.S. Lewis to go along with our study of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe). It was okay, but we didn’t love it. Because of that experience, I was unsure about whether to request another book from them or not. Before I totally wrote it off, though, I went through a couple of the options being offered. For reasons I couldn’t place my finger on at the time, the story of Jacob DeShazer really spoke to me. I wanted to read his story, and I wanted my kids to hear it, so I requested the book, which is part of the Christian Heroes: Then and Now series. In addition to the biography, Christian Heroes – Jacob DeShazer, we also received a digital copy of the corresponding study guide (you can’t access this page without a YWAM account, but there is a generic page with the list of all the different study guides.).

Jacob de Shazer biography review

About the Book

Based on the brief summary on the website, I knew that Jacob DeShazer was a soldier in WWII who was a POW in a Japanese prison for over three years. I learned that after the war ended, he was released and later became a missionary to Japan – ministering to the very culture that had imprisoned him. What I didn’t know was that when he wasn’t in Japan, he called the Willamette Valley in Oregon home – the very place where we live! I even learned that there were some people in our church who knew Mr. DeShazer personally. (He died at age 95 in 2008, so the people we know who knew him are very old and don’t always come to church so we weren’t able to talk to them, unfortunately.)

Jacob deShazer coverThe biography opens during Jacob’s (Jake, in the book) childhood. He grew up with a mother, stepfather, and 8 siblings in rural central Oregon, on a farm. He abandoned the family’s Christian faith as a young adult, and in an attempt to get away from his parents, he took several odd jobs during his early 20s. By his mid- to late-twenties, WWII started, America entered the battle, and he decided to enlist in the Air Force to fight for the cause. Before very long, we’re following Jake through boot camp and his early assignments in California. While there, a group of men were brought in to talk to the boss and invited to join a top secret mission. Even the boss didn’t know enough to tell them what to expect outside of “it will be very dangerous.” The men were given the opportunity to accept or reject the invitation, no questions asked and no penalty for rejecting, and every single one of them accepted it. Clear up until they were on the aircraft carrier USS Hornet in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, the mission was kept secret. They eventually learned that they would be bombing Japan in retaliation of the Pearl Harbor attack in what later became known as the Doolittle Raid. When his plane crashed in Japanese-controlled China (instead of free China, where they were supposed to land) after the bombing, Jake and his crewmates were captured, imprisoned, and held for 40 months. During those 40 months (near the end), the men were given three books to share (even though they had separate cells – most of the time they were kept in solitary confinement). One of these was a Bible. Reading the Bible, Jake realized the truth behind his parents’ religion and became a Christian. His faith kept him going as his life continued to get worse.

When the war ended and Jake was released, he knew that God was telling him that he was to be a missionary – to Japan. I don’t know about you, but I know that I’d have a very hard time with this. It would be incredibly easy to be vindictive and have a “they don’t deserve salvation” attitude after going through the hardships of a prison camp (which are reasonably detailed in the book; I didn’t really mention them here). But Jake didn’t have this attitude. He knew that everyone – even the prison guards and others in Japan – deserved salvation just as much as he did. So upon returning to America, he got his discharge from the military and went to Seattle Pacific College to train for missions work in the Free Methodist Church. College is where he met Florence, who would become his wife. Florence knew that God was calling her to be a missionary, too, but she didn’t know to where. Meeting and marrying Jake made that decision for her. Upon graduation, the two of them started their family (they ended up with 5 children, 4 of whom were born in Japan – the oldest was a year and a half old when the went) and missionary work in Japan.

Our Experience

Because I was the one who chose this book (I didn’t confer with the boys at all on our choice), I decided I wanted to read it aloud to them. Munchkin likes to read, but mostly just the stuff he chooses to read. Seahawk is a fine reader, but he doesn’t like to read. He’d never pick up a book out of his own free will. And I didn’t want to miss this book. So reading it aloud was the best option for us.

watching the doolittle raid

Watching the Doolittle Raid newsreel.

While I would have loved to have made this book a full-blown unit study, it arrived during the time we were dealing with some personal stuff surrounding our old house and moving, so it just wasn’t going to work out this time around. We did, however, use the Bible verse memorization and reading comprehension pages in the study guide. In addition to reading the book and using the questions in the study guide, we supplemented our reading by learning more about the type of plane that Jake flew (a B25 Mitchell bomber) and about the Doolittle Raid itself. We found a newsreel on YouTube about the Raid and watched that. We talked extensively about what it would be like to have been in Jake’s shoes and how we would have reacted the the situations in which he found himself. Despite not using the study guide extensively, I still feel that we had a very rich experience reading this book.

Parts of the study guide that we didn’t utilize include essay/research prompts (compare Jacob before and after his conversion, learn about the GI Bill, talk about the history of Christianity in Japan, etc); creative writing (write a haiku, write journal entries from Jake’s point of view, etc); hands on activities (make an illustrated timeline, build a model B25 bomber, learn Morse code, etc); audio visual (make a website about Jacob De Shazer, etc); arts and crafts (illustrate Jake’s life using Manga techniques, create origami, etc); language (learn a few phrases in Japanese); and much, much more. With the proper preparation and materials, it would be really easy to use the study guide and biography together to make an amazing unit study.

Our first time reading a YWAM Publishing book, as I mentioned before, was “just okay.” Our second one could not have been better. I literally had a difficult time reading the last few pages to the boys because I felt like I knew Jake by the end, and reading about his dementia and death were devastating. I cried. I cannot recommend this book enough, and I truly hope more people will read it and learn the story of how one man – Jacob De Shazer – was able to forgive his enemies.

Blessings,

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Christian & History Heroes {YWAM Publishing Reviews}
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Picture of the Week: It’s Mine

Earlier this week, the bigger boys had ballet rehearsal (they’re gearing up for a performance next weekend). The ballet studio we use is pretty far from where we’re living right now (we’ll be moving closer mid to late summer), so I stay in town while they’re at class. This week, I took the two little boys to the park while we were waiting. They had loads of fun, but the funniest thing was Dragonfly. We brought a sippy cup of water for him because it was really hot that day, and every time he came down the slide, I asked him if he wanted me to hold his cup. He would pull it away from me and say “Mine!” (although when he says it, it sounds more like “Mah!”) and then head up the stairs again, tightly clutching his cup. He was so cute climbing and sliding with that cup held so close. 🙂

PITW Its Mine

Have a great weekend!

Blessings,

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Book Club: The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion (part 2)

Book Club with Lori

I cannot believe how long it took me to finish this book! Sheesh. Please believe me when I say it’s not because I didn’t like the book; it was pretty good. I just have a hard time making time for recreational reading these days.

Lori posted about it way back at the beginning of the month; I hope you’ll take a moment to read her thoughts.

Questions are from LitLovers. Spoiler alert is in effect.

A lot of Southern identity is wrapped up in one’s family history. “Now, just who are your people?” is an oft-quoted phrase around the region. Sookie’s biggest crisis comes when she realizes that her “people” aren’t actually who she thought they were. How does Sookie’s discovery of her true family affect her identity?

I think Sookie took the information of her own adoption to a crazy place. It’s one thing to be stunned and to then try to find out more about your “true” heritage, but the way she abandoned her adopted mother for a time and kept going on and on about how she “wasn’t a real Simmons” was over the top. It affected her too deeply, in my opinion. It completely changed her outlook on life and yes, her identity, in ways it shouldn’t have.

Though Sookie tells us that Lenore’s nickname, “Winged Victory,” came from the way she entered a room—as if she were the statuesque piece on the hood of a car rushing in—how might “Winged Victory” reflect Lenore’s personality in other ways? How might the image of a winged woman tie Lenore in with the ladies of the WASPs?

I can definitely understand the nickname Winged Victory for Lenore. She was a very bold person, just the type that would be all about winning things (Victory). Her boldness could also be like that of a bird of prey – and she did seem to prey on the people around her to a certain extent. The image of a winged woman relating to the WASP women is obvious – they flew airplanes, and a “winged woman” would be one who can fly.

Sookie’s best friend, Marvaleen, is constantly trying different suggestions from her life coach, Edna Yorba Zorbra. From journaling to yoga to the Goddess Within group, which meets in a yurt, Marvaleen tries every method possible to get over her divorce. How does Sookie’s approach to dealing with her problems differ from Marvaleen’s?

Marvaleen is all about trying gimmicky things to deal with her issues. Sookie is very pragmatic – she sees a therapist (albeit in secret, kind of). I think that shows that Sookie is more willing to face her problems head on than Marvaleen. While Marvaleen is busy doing yoga or going to fruity self-help groups, Sookie is getting professional help and actually talking over her problems with someone who can actually guide her in helping herself.

In The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion, we learn about a mostly unknown part of American history—the WASPs of World War II. These women went for thirty-five years without recognition because their records of service were sealed and classified. Were you surprised to learn about this?

The idea that the records were sealed is unfortunate, but for some reason didn’t surprise me. I’d never heard about the troupe, but it was a really neat aspect of the novel. What I did find surprising about the whole thing was the man at the end of the book who was running a WWII airplane museum, and when Sookie told him about the WASPs, he wasn’t the least bit interested – in fact, he seemed rather snooty about it when Sookie and her daughter suggested he include WASP history in his presentation. That didn’t feel real to me.

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So there you go… I really did enjoy this book, and if you’re a fan of the film Fried Green Tomatoes, I recommend reading this book – it’s by the same author.

Blessings,

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Learning to Type Methodically (The Typing Coach review)

For the past few weeks, my boys (the older two) have been learning to type using The Typing Coach Online Typing Course. This program works in a very methodical way, teaching students to type just a few letters at a time. The Typing Coach teaches the home row first, then the top row, and finally the bottom row and numbers. Each row is taught independently before being combined, and the course emphasizes absolute mastery before moving on.

The Typing Coach Review

The Typing Coach is very easily adaptable to individual students because it’s “work at your own pace.” The goal is one lesson per week, but it’s definitely not set in stone; we had to move slower in order for the boys to get the mastery that the course requires in order to move on.

There are a few things you need to do the course. One is a reliable internet connection to listen to the audio portions and download the typing practice sheets. The other is a computer with a word processor (I hope that’s obvious, but just in case…). The goal is that by the end of the course, students will be able to type a minimum of 10 words per minute with no more than one mistake per minute.

How It Works

 Once you’ve downloaded the practice sheets, you need to either print it out or have it available some other way for students to look at while they’re typing. (Having it in a different portion on the same screen isn’t ideal.) Our printer is currently out of ink, so I put the document on my iPad and the boys used iBooks to read it and type. Then, log in to your account and find the lesson you need. The very first one is all about posture; then you move on to actually typing. For each lesson, there’s an audio to listen to. The audio works in tandem (and sometimes separately) with the downloaded document. There are a lot of different components to the audio lessons:

  • Making sure you’re sitting properly and the keyboard is positioned correctly to your body.
  • Beginning to type what you see on the document.
  • Typing letters from dictation.
  • Turning off (or hiding) the monitor and typing from the document again.

(There might be other parts that I’ve missed, but this is what I remember based on when the boys did these lessons.)

The student can practice, using the downloaded practice sheet, as many days as is needed to master the assigned keys. When they feel confident, there’s a slightly different website to go to to take a test. On the testing website, students enter their name and a parent’s email address (or your own, if you’re taking the course as an adult). They enter the amount of time allowed for the test and choose the test they’re taking from a drop down menu. After you click “start,” a new screen opens up with a box in it. The time starts when the first key is typed in the box. At the end of the time, a report is automatically sent to the email address specified before the test began. If the student passed (no more than one mistake per minute), then they can move on to the next lesson. If they don’t, they should practice for another day or two and then try again.

How We Used It

The two older boys used the program pretty much as I described in the previous section. The boys would use my laptop (with the “print outs” on the iPad next to them) and follow the audio for the lesson they were on. After a few days of working on the lesson, they attempted the test. If they passed, they could move on. If not, they went back to the practice sheets for a few days before trying again. To date, they’re both still working on the home row, but we went through a bit of time right after we moved where we didn’t have reliable internet access, so we were unable to start the program as soon as I wanted. Additionally, the emphasis on mastery is such that just one week on a lesson hasn’t been enough for them. Now that things are settled down (mostly), they’re doing a lesson or having a 20-minute practice each school day. After two or three days of doing the lesson with the audio, they decided that they prefer to do the audio in the beginning, but just type when they’re gearing up for the test. Just yesterday, they both attempted a test and got 2 mistakes over 1 minute. While not terrible, this is too many for The Typing Coach, so they’ll spend today and tomorrow practicing before attempting the test again to (hopefully) be able to move on to the top row.

Our Thoughts on the Program

My boys love this! Even though they’re not making progress very fast, they are by no means getting discouraged. Every time he finishes a lesson or practice session, Munchkin tells me, “I love typing!” Seahawk hasn’t said anything quite so exuberant, but I can tell that he’s enjoying it as well. Just in a 13-year-old, too cool for school kind of way.

Finally

The Typing Coach Online Typing Course retails for $17 per year per student. If this fits into your homeschool budget, I highly recommend giving it a try. If your student is really motivated, they should be touch-typing by the end of the first quarter.

Blessings,

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The Typing Coach Online Typing Course {The Typing Coach Reviews}
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Kwik Stix are Back and Now They’re Thin! (review)

We’ve been lucky enough to review Kwik Stix a couple of times in the past, and today I feel lucky to share with you their newest product: Thin Stix. From The Pencil Grip, Inc., Kwik Stix are a revolutionary product that allows children to paint with absolutely no mess. The solid tempera paint come in tubes not unlike glue sticks, and once applied to paper, they dry in just 90 seconds. For this review, I received one set of Thin Stix 6pk of Classic Colors.

Kwik Stix review May 2017

So how do Thin Stix differ from traditional Kwik Stix? Well, as the name implies, they’re much thinner. This allows artists young and old to get more detailed with their coloring. The regular sized Kwik Stix are about the size of glue sticks. Thin stix are somewhere between a pen and a glue stick. They’re not as small and detailed as a pen, but they’re considerably smaller than the original Kwik Stix. They also have a clip on the caps (like a pen). Other than that, they work very much the same.

In our family, Small Fry was the main beneficiary of the “paint sticks,” as he calls them. They arrived the day Will was in the hospital having surgery, and we were out until very late that night because of that. For this reason, he didn’t actually get to paint anything until the next day, but he was very excited about that the morning after surgery. While we waited for the phone call saying that Will was ready to be picked up and brought home, I let Small Fry paint. He chose to make a get well card for his dad.

Thin Stix artworkHe’s at a stage in his artistic life where he draws the same thing over and over again, and this project was no exception. He used the Thin Stix to draw a Mr. Potato Head and his name. (He’s so cute about writing his name, too. He always writes his first name and last initial in capital and lowercase – he thinks the one letter twice is how to write our surname. He’s not totally wrong, either – we have that letter in two of the three syllables of our last name. But still . . . cute.)

The other thing that these got used for (and unfortunately, I don’t have a picture) was to make tiger stripes on the cardboard “armor” that Munchkin has been making for himself lately. He really likes to create things out of paperboard, and for the past several months he’s been working on a whole suit of armor. To date, he has a helmet, one shoulder guard, a breastplate, and wrist guards. During the review period for Thin Stix, he created the wrist guards. After getting them the right size, he covered the paperboard with regular white paper and used the black paint stick to draw the tiger stripes.

So, what do we think of Thin Stix? Just like their “fat” counterparts, we adore them! I can’t recommend Thin Stix enough. If your kids like doing art projects, you definitely need Kwik Stix in your life. You can purchase them from Amazon or the Toys R Us website. Even better is winning a set, though! The Pencil Grip, Inc. has graciously offered to provide a set of Thin Stix to one lucky reader of this post. Enter using the Giveaway Tools widget below. The giveaway runs from now through Sunday, May 28, 2017 at 11:59 pm PST. Good luck!

Blessings,

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No Mess Art with Thin Stix Classic Colors {The Pencil Grip, Inc. Reviews}
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My Week in Pictures: May 20

Besides the normal school etc…, we had a fun week. Here’s a taste.

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This picture wasn’t taken this week, but it was perfect for Mother’s Day – all four of my boys in one photograph. 

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We found a pond just a few blocks from where we’re staying right now, and there are lots of ducks and geese who live there. The boys have had a really fun time going to visit them. We went twice last week, and it’s really neat to see them interacting with nature so freely. We took some bread one day (old hamburger buns) and taught Small Fry how to tear it very small so that his portion would last a long time. By the end, Will and Seahawk had some of the geese literally eating out of their hands. That was pretty cool. Small Fry tried to let one of them eat from his hand, and it nipped at his fingers even though he did everything right and held his hand very flat. After that he was happy to just toss the bread.

When we ran out of bread, we walked around to the other side of the pond where Seahawk and Munchkin skipped some rocks. Seahawk is a natural at that (at most athletic things, actually) and was able to get 5+ skips a few different times.

IMG_0179After we left the pond, we were going to go to a local ice cream place where they have lots of different (unusual) flavors of ice cream. Will and I went there a week or so ago and had the rose petal flavor (it tastes mostly like vanilla, but there’s an aftertaste that is just what you’d think roses taste like based on their scent). Unfortunately, they were closed by the time we got there, so we went to Dairy Queen instead. Small Fry was pretty excited about the Guardians of the Galaxy cutout there and wanted his picture taken, so we did that for him. He has a photo album that he loves to look at full of pictures of some of the experiences we’ve done together. I’m sure this one will end up in there at some point.

IMG_0217That night, after we’d been asleep for a few hours, Small Fry came into our room crying. I woke up to find out what was going on with him; he said his lip was hurting a lot. I took him into the bathroom so I could turn the light on without bothering anyone else and take a look. He had quite the fat lip and was bleeding just a little bit up underneath. The blood wasn’t severe, so I got him calmed down and back into bed so we could all get enough sleep and deal with it more in the morning.

The following morning, when neither of us were as tired, I got the full story out of him. Turns out he’d fallen out of bed during the night, and because the boys are in such close quarters (all four are sharing one room temporarily), he slammed his face into Seahawk’s bed frame when he fell, hence the fat lip and bleeding. It was very sore all that day, and the next afternoon he came running up to give me a hug and very gently bonked into me. Even though it was hardly any pressure at all, it was enough to break open the scab under his lip and he started bleeding profusely. We got that under control, and everything’s been fine since then.

IMG_0221The last picture I have to share is Munchkin in his new glasses. The boys qualify for their annual eye exams each spring, so we make sure to get them done every year. Seahawk and Small Fry don’t have any issues, but we get them checked anyway. Dragonfly is small enough that he doesn’t need exams yet, but the eye doctor said starting next year, he will. Munchkin, though, wears glasses. He has since he was 5, when he was diagnosed with an astigmatism. He tells me that he doesn’t remember a time that he didn’t have glasses. I remember his first pair of glasses, and that was a magical time. He was small, and didn’t even realize he hadn’t been seeing very well. We took him to pick up his glasses a few days after the eye exam, and as soon as he put them on, his face lit up. He could see so well! That really was a wonderful moment.

Blessings,

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A Christian Superhero? {Captain} Absolutely! (book review)

Comic books and graphic novels are all the rage for kids these days, and for good reason. They help take reluctant readers and turn them into voracious readers (often). They give already voracious readers something “easy” to read. If the comic includes a superhero and a lot of action, then it’s even better, especially for the 8-13 year old boys (of which I have two). But what do you do if you (the parent) aren’t really “into” mainstream superheroes? Is there an option for you and your kids? Yes!

Book Review Captain Absolutely #hsreviews #faith #captainabsolutely #comicbook #character

Captain Absolutely originally appeared in the Focus on the Family magazine, Clubhouse. It was published there, two pages at a time, over the course of five years. Now it’s available on its own as a paperback book. The comics were written by Stephen O’Rear and Christopher P.N. Maselli, and based on the character created by Paul McCusker. There’s an introduction before the story starts by “Wooten Z. Bassett, Mailman, Licorice Enthusiast, and Creator of Captain Absolutely.” It doesn’t give any specifics about Wooten, but because his name isn’t in the copyright page, I assume he’s made up. That doesn’t make what he has to say any less deep, though. He summarizes Hebrews 12:2 for us, reminding us to keep our eyes and minds on Jesus. Doing this allows us to be shaped by the absolute truth, hence the name of the book’s main character. The villains in the story were designed to teach children how to combat the lies that may come up as we “defend” our Christian faith and evangelize to others.

captain absolutely interiorKnowing this is the goal of the book, I was really pleased that my 10-year-old son, Munchkin, got the chance to read it. Because of the format (lots of pictures, few words), it took him only one afternoon to read the whole thing. My 13-year-old isn’t as into books as his younger brother, but he typically enjoys graphic novels, so I’ll probably have him read it soon too.

From Munchkin:

The story is about a guy, Josiah King, who works at the library. His friend accidentally blows up the computer, and Josiah is trapped in a room full of Bibles. He starts reading God’s word and becomes a superhero called Captain Absolutely. He fights a bunch of bad guys and puts them in a bunch of prisons, which they escape from a lot. He fights them again, they escape again. It’s a vicious cycle.

captain absolutely cover 2He eventually gets the main bad guy, Dr. Relative, to believe in the Bible and join his team.

I thought this book was interesting. Usually I like “regular” books better, but Captain Absolutely was really fun to read. This was only the third graphic novel I’ve ever read, and I liked it.

Overall, I’m glad we had a chance to review this book. It was a fun read for Munchkin, and anything with a good message is a win as far as I’m concerned.

Other members of the Homeschool Review Crew are talking about Captain Absolutely this week, too. Be sure to head over to the Crew blog to find out more.

Blessings,

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5 Random Things: May 12

5 random things

 

  1. During the time I’ve been reading Jacob De Shazer: Forgive Your Enemies to the boys (we finished it today; look for a review later this month), I’ve decided/realized that reading together is my favorite way to do homeschool with them. For this reason, I think we’re going to try out Ambleside Online for our curriculum next fall. I’d start now, but the timing for that would be a bit weird considering it’s almost June 😉
  2. My Aqua Zumba class got canceled due to lack of participation. The pool claimed that our class wasn’t making enough to pay the lifeguard, much less the other expenses involved with us being there, so they canceled the class. Despite the fact that this has been in the works for several months, it’s still frustrating on a variety of levels. First, I’ve been doing the class for a year and a half, and we’ve consistently had the same number of people. It wasn’t until January that they started making noise about canceling it. Second, the Zumba class isn’t the only thing going on at that time, but apparently it was the only one responsible for paying the bills. But whatever. Life goes on. (No bitterness here, can you tell?)
  3. There is, however, an Aqua Zumba class in the town we moved to, so I’m going to start going to that one instead, effective tomorrow. It won’t be quite the same (different pool, different teacher), but I’m familiar with the teacher here because she subbed for my other class a few times. She’s good, so I’m confident the class will be just as good as my other one.
  4. Munchkin has been drawing nonstop. He’s getting quite good. I’ll try to remember to share a few of his pictures next week.
  5. We’re living with my in-laws temporarily. The interpersonal part of that is going pretty well, but the location is a bit frustrating. The town they live in is really far from any of our normal activities, so everything takes way longer now.

Have a great weekend!

Blessings,

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